Zika Virus is becoming a serious threat

 

Ana Beatriz, a Brazilian baby born with microcephaly, at 4 months. In a new report, researchers say they have isolated the Zika virus in the brain of a fetus aborted after a sonogram at 29 weeks found it to have microcephaly.

Ana Beatriz, a Brazilian baby born with microcephaly, at 4 months. In a new report, researchers say they have isolated the Zika virus in the brain of a fetus aborted after a sonogram at 29 weeks found it to have microcephaly.

The disease can cause fever rash, joint pain, and redness in the whites of the eye. But most people won’t know they have it.“Only about 1 in 5 people with the virus will exhibit symptoms,” says Amesh Adalja, MD, a spokesman for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. “The vast majority have no symptoms at all.”Zika has “never been thought of as a severe infectious disease until now,” Adalja says.

 

Blood donations in two counties in Florida have been halted by the FDA as there are now 4 possible cases of the Zika virus in the state. The big issue here is that signs are pointing to these being local cases, not travel related. Most Zika virus cases in the US have come from people traveling to countries in Latin and South America and bringing the virus back with them. The CDC has announced that evidence in these 4 new cases point to transmission via mosquitoes since they fit previous transmission patterns seen with other mosquito born illnesses.




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